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5 Things You Need to Know to Be a Better ITSM Leader

For IT leaders, there is always something to contemplate for the IT team and the organization’s future. This isn’t hyperbole, as the continuous improvements charted by IT leaders will determine if they have the capabilities to compete as a digital business. ITSM plays a critical role in the process, enabling digital business outcomes. An ITSM leader, therefore, is responsible for corresponding needs for resources, capacity, security, and risk management of a business. Joe the IT ...

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How to Protect Your Team’s Time

Time is as valuable as gold, and managing time is like keeping the gold intact. Both you and your team need to make a commitment to meet the deadlines and keep track of the project. Christian Bisson, in a post for Voices on Project Management, offers three tips to help you protect team members’ time and ensure timely delivery: Trust your team. Clarify requirements and objectives. Protect their priorities. Make Your Time Count You can’t ...

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Project Scope Creep and How to Success

Project scope creep is not something strange to IT managers anymore, and it is actually an inherent part of IT development. However, scope creep can make direct impacts on a project, such as increased costs, stretched timelines, and negative customer satisfaction and team morale. But it is not “incurable” since all you need is a concrete plan and a proactive stance on the project. Leigh Epsy, in a post for Project Bliss, says that the ...

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Why Being a Middle Manager Is So Exhausting

Middle managers have to shift between the roles of a leader and a subordinate regularly. In an article for Harvard Business Review, Eric M. Anicich and Jacob B. Hirsh say that middle managers naturally adopt a more deferential low-power behavioral style when interacting with their superiors, while using a more assertive high-power behavioral style to communicate with subordinates. The result is increased anxiety and sometimes even health issues. Take Middle Managers Easy Humans are inherently ...

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Keeping Workplace Humor Free of Lawsuits

In a bummer of a post for PM Hut, Dave Clemens approaches the topic of workplace humor from an HR perspective. He basically comes across as the Comedy Police. But if you think you could use some of that at your office, read on. Clemens finds that, while everyone knows actual verbal fighting is unacceptable in the workplace, humorous “mock” fights are fair game. In such cases, jokes can push the limits of acceptability as ...

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Leading with Humor

In an article for Harvard Business Review, Alison Beard examines a couple books that try to get at the root of what constitutes “humor.” From them, she attempts to distill how anyone, even you, can solicit a chuckle at the office. Her challenge in this endeavor is that these books—like most books about humor—focus on literal jokes, as opposed to being funny on a whim in a conversation. In most cases, a person is going ...

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10 Ways Humor Enriches Work

Everyone likes to smile, so convincing people that humor is a good thing is not the hardest sell. Nonetheless, Jacquelyn Smith highlights 10 ways that humor can improve the work environment in an article for Forbes. Here they are in brief: People like people who make them laugh, making humor good for team cohesion. Humor decreases stress from multiple angles simultaneously. Humor is an equalizer, putting people of varied career rungs on equal footing. Humor ...

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Using Humor in the Office: When It Works, When It Backfires

In an interview with Wharton, Maurice Schweitzer and Brad Bitterly (Bitterly gets around) discuss their research findings on when humor helps and hinders business. Essentially, when humor signals confidence and competence, it is good. And when humor is used in poor taste or to be a class clown, it is bad. That is because humor of the latter variety indicates a lack of competence, which is disruptive to your career prospects. Notably, the research suggests ...

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3 Tips to Use Humor Naturally at Work

If you try too hard to be funny, everyone will hate you. That is why Jennifer Winter offers some practical tips to be funny in your own natural way in an article for the Muse. For instance, her first tip is to stop trying to be funny. She explains how, in the past, urges to try and be funny just because her colleagues were being funny would come back to bite her—because her jokes were ...

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The Verified Effects of How It Pays to Be Funny at Work

Humor has powerful observed effects on the workplace. In an article for the Wall Street Journal, Alison Wood Brooks and Brad Bitterly itemize its many benefits and also some risks. Here are some highlights compiled from varied research: Teams that tell more jokes together communicate more effectively, offering more supportive and constructive comments to each other. Some sarcasm can increase creativity, but it is best to save it for colleagues who already trust you. Pairing ...

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How to Make Your Team More Unified

Having team unity is like living in a country with no internal factors and personal conflicts. Team unity helps team members complete activities on time, proactively seek to communicate and collaborate, show respect to differences of other team members, and always be prepared to contribute to the team. As such, it is useful for project managers to create a team constitution, a list of shared values, when initiating projects. With a team constitution, you can ...

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How Incentive Pay Affects Employee Engagement, Satisfaction, and Trust

Being motivated and engaged at work results in job satisfaction, work productivity, and organizational commitment. As such, many organizations have been offering employees performance-based bonuses, company profit-related pay, or share ownership. Sometimes, these incentives work perfectly as expected, but other times, they backfire. In an article for Harvard Business Review, Chidiebere Ogbonnaya, Kevin Daniels, and Karina Nielsen share their research on the subject. Their study indicated that performance-related pay was positively associated with job satisfaction, organizational ...

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5 Ways IT Projects Can Fail

IT project failures can repeat like seasons if a project team keeps stepping on the same rake. Some project managers never learn a lesson from their past experience and improve, while others seeks change and innovation. IT projects are prone to unexpected errors, bad time management, or lack of monitoring. In an article for DZone, Joe Lewis lists five mistakes that can be made in project management: Lack of executive buy-in Overly optimistic timelines Poor ...

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10 New Make-or-Break Priorities for the CIO

In 2017, Gartner’s CIO agenda survey showed that 34 percent of CIOs are already leading their companies’ innovation efforts. This eagerness must continue. Kevin Hansel, in an article for InformationWeek, says that CIOs today should be able to move their companies’ digital transformations forward, make an impact on overall business operations, and ultimately succeed in the role. He explores 10 career-defining priorities that today’s CIOs must tackle: Control SaaS sprawl Drive IT innovation as a ...

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The Psychological Power of Simple Websites

Simplicity is the key to brilliance. We know if something is simple when we see it, but having to craft simplicity ourselves is another subject. When it comes to websites, simplicity is often underrated, but it is an essential factor in appealing to the audience’s senses. Lucas Miller, in an article for Business 2 Community, says that a good website often has these three simple things built into it: Predictable: They’re easy on the brain ...

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