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Monthly Archives: April 2016

Using Letters to the Editor to Get Noticed

Competition is fierce and constant in consulting, so consultants are always on the lookout for more ways to get noticed. In a post for the Institute of Management Consultants USA, Mark Haas recommends a tip that most may not have considered for gaining exposure. It involves a little writing. Leave a Comment Blogs, public speaking, and associations are three of the most common ways by which consultants broadcast their names and abilities. By the definition …

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How to Develop a Consultant’s Three-Month Marketing Calendar

Not everyone is a born-marketer, nor should they have to be. In a post for Consulting Success, Michael Zipursky shares a process for how consultants can build a three-month marketing calendar. His goal is to help consultants create not only a good schedule but one that they will feel obligated to actually execute. A Plan That Works Developing grandiose plans for things can be a reliable way to ensure that nothing ever actually gets done, …

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4 Steps to Get Your Consultancy on Track

When you are growing a professional services firm, there are so many variables to consider to ensure that the business stays healthy. In an article for MindShare Consulting, Michael W. McLaughlin explains that there are some fundamentals that, when understood, will generally help to keep all of the other variables aligning nicely. There are four steps: Take your own marketing advice. Walk in your client’s shoes. Conduct your project with finesse. Thrive on uncertainty. All …

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Play Nicely with Your Client’s Other Consultants

It is actually pretty common these days for consultants to be expected to work side by side with consultants from other firms to achieve a business’s goals. There will likely be consequences for those who cannot play well together. In a concise post for the Institute of Management Consultants USA, Mark Haas touches upon how to handle these relationships. Let’s Get Along You are always going to find a few jerks in every profession, including …

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2 Common Consulting Proposal Mistakes and How to Fix Them

The proposal is clearly a critical aspect of landing consulting work. In a post for Consulting Success, Michael Zipursky shares two mistakes that hold consultants back in their proposals. Embody these tips to ensure you put the best foot forward the next time around. Problems Solved The first point Zipursky highlights is essentially the idea that written proposals should be summaries of ideas that have already been discussed. Proposals should clarify finite details of the …

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Are You Changing the Direction or Only the Scenery?

When it comes to change management, too much compromise with a grumbling opposition can result in a change of scenery rather than a change of direction. In an article at MindShare Consulting, Michael McLaughlin discusses what it takes to make meaningful change. It involves more than plugging your ears to complaints. Framing Change The first problem that arises with change management is when consultants (or change managers, or whoever is leading the change in the …

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Why Solo Consultants Need Business Continuity Plans

A business continuity plan can mean different things to different people, especially one person operating independently. Consultants should consider building a very informal one. Mark Haas explains why this is a good idea in a post for the Institute of Management Consultants USA. Little Contingencies The traditional business continuity plan is the thing that tells the business what to do after Hurricane Katrina or some other disaster hits. It explains what to do to salvage …

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3 Signs Your Consulting Firm Will Fail

Armageddon, apocalypse, doomsday, Ragnarok—the end goes by many names, and in spite of how cool they all sound, nobody looks forward to any of them. Likewise, nobody wants to work for a failing consultancy, but there are a few obvious signs that things could be headed south. In a post at his blog, Lew Sauder discusses three of them: Cutting costs An expanding bench of consultants A narrowing pipeline Tick Tock If nice perks like …

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How to Specialize Your Services Even If You Are Not a Specialist

In the process of buying a fence for his backyard, Michael McLaughlin observed a pretty darn good sales tactic from the fencing guy he hired. The guy had developed a business model that allowed him to emphasize specialized services while actually still offering a variety of general services. Consultants should take note. Fenced into One Thing? McLaughlin did his homework before hiring a fencing contractor, and the person he selected is known as “the” fence …

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Contractual Documents Used in Consulting

The worst kinds of arguments are the arguments over money. In order to prevent hostile blowouts over things like money, contracts came into existence. In a post at his blog, Lew Sauder details some of the basic contractual documents with which consultants should familiarize themselves to avoid sticky situations. Write It Down Sauder knew a friend who decided to get into consulting, and so that guy consulted for another friend. They had a handshake agreement, …

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