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Monthly Archives: February 2016

Applying Agile Beyond Software Development

Sometimes, you see people make mistakes that are so counterintuitive that you wonder how they could have ever been made in the first place. In a post for Mountain Goat Software, Mike Cohn recalls a time he saw how agile principles could have remedied a seemingly menial problem. A Common Sense Problem On a recent trip, Cohn was to stay in a Marriott hotel. Upon arrival, he was impressed with the hotel itself. As he …

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Scrum Is Just a Starting Point

Sometimes, you need to punish the rule breakers—people who steal, who cheat, who think socks with sandals is acceptable. But when it comes to scrum, sensible rule-breaking is just good business. In a post at his blog, the Clever PM explains how too much fervent adherence to The Scrum Guide is not an admirable thing. Scrum Is Not One Thing The Clever PM explains that he recently talked to someone who followed the practices of …

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Knowledge Management within an Agile Workplace

When an ace team member leaves the company, it can be the Jenga piece that sends the whole tower flying. Nobody can capably transfer all the critical knowledge of the departing person to the rest of the team in such a small time box. In an article for Scrum Alliance, Joe Kelley elaborates on how a healthy combination of scrum and knowledge management can avoid such calamities. Balanced Brains One problem with having the departing …

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Best Agile Method for Your Team: Scrum vs. Kanban

Choosing between scrum and kanban is like choosing between Android and iOS, or Coca Cola and Pepsi. They are all different flavors of things that ultimately help you achieve the same thing. In an article for InformationWeek, Curtis Franklin Jr. elaborates on the finer points of scrum and kanban, so you can make the best decision about how to become agile. The Merits of the Methods Waterfall has been the prevalent method driving enterprises for …

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Scrum Master vs. Project Manager: Know the Difference

Scrum Master and project manager have different titles, but do they really have different job descriptions? Yes, they do! In an article for Scrum Alliance, Eugene L. elaborates on why these unique roles need to be defined individually in order to ensure project success. Managing or Guiding? The project manager is the person who leads a project to success by achieving goals along the way. The role itself is normally defined depending upon the environment …

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Do Agile Certifications Mean Anything?

With the plethora of certifications available to earn, do they really hold the same weight as what they once did? Especially with agile, can a piece of paper guarantee a person has both the skills and correct cultural mindset to be successful? In an article for CIO.com, Sharon Florentine explores the true value of agile certifications. Certifiable Conclusions The bottom line is that certifications do not guarantee any sort of success for a project. Certification …

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Should Scrum Teams Include a Stretch Goal in Their Sprints?

On your mark, get set, go! You and your team have charged full speed ahead toward a clear goal for where you would like to be at the end of this sprint, but is that goal enough? In a post for Mountain Goat Software, Mike Cohn explains whether it might benefit you to incorporate a “stretch goal” into your sprint. Just a Little Further? Deciding to have a stretch goal is a decision that should …

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The Effect of Time on Value in Your Agile Projects

The elusive American dream has shifted from the hard-working man returning home from a long day at the office to one where he finds any possible way to minimize his workload. The reality is, if businesses continually do this, nothing will ever get done. In an article for AgileConnection, Allan Kelly explores why the time spent on a project determines the value seen in it. Value Divided by Time It is unfortunate, but organizations have …

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7 Sins of Scrum

The devil is in the details, which means scrum comes with plenty of opportunities to unwittingly do evil. In an article for Scrum Alliance, Nilesh Shah elaborates on seven sins of scrum that pervert a pristine methodology into something harmful and unusable: Equating work hours to story points Embellishing story points Assigning the Scrum Master hat to the project manager Assuming the Scrum Master is the product owner Not having daily stand-ups Having your sprint …

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Value of Burndown and Burnup Charts

Is your manager constantly telling your team that the velocity is “too late?” In a post at her blog, Johanna Rothman elaborates on the importance and purpose of burndown and burnup charts, and what they really imply. A burndown chart is a measure of what has been finished. In a real scenario that Rothman shares, a particular team’s chart indicated that they were not completing work at an adequate enough speed until near the end …

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