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Monthly Archives: December 2015

Minimum Viable Product to Defend from Risk

Minimum viable product (MVP) has a variety of practical applications, and one of them is risk management. In a concise article for Scrum Alliance, Olufemi Sonuga explains why MVP is so useful against risk. And as we all know, anything that mitigates project risk is worth our consideration. Risk in the Environment Sonuga was recently talking to a senior scrum master who failed to understand why Sonuga advocated use of MVP in agile. The scrum …

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How Do You ‘Sell’ Agile to Colleagues?

You know that agile is the greatest thing since sliced bread, and that maybe you would eat it as a sandwich if it were physically possible. But how do you convince colleagues? In a post at Managed Agile, Chuck Cobb makes the case for winning everyone over to the agile side of life. Selling the Agile Agenda The first thing Cobb recommends is to stop “selling” exactly—nobody likes to have something shoved down their throat. …

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Has Agile Outlived Its Usefulness?

In an article for Forbes, Jason Bloomberg questions if agile’s problems are starting to outweigh its benefits, and if it is time for something else to replace it. Everyone grab your torches and pitchforks. This is going to get messy. Agile Away Here are the chief problems Bloomberg sees with agile and its most successful offspring, scrum: The numerous complaints about Agile include its lack of focus on software architecture, its emphasis on one-off software …

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Should You Use Zero-Point Estimates on Your Product Backlog?

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? If you assign work on an agile project that grants zero velocity points, does the work matter? These are the deep philosophical questions that haunt a man to his soul. Fortunately, Mike Cohn has written a post that rather cleanly clears up the latter question, so that you can feel slightly less haunted. Half-Haunted, Maybe …

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Pair Writing: The Benefits of Working with a Partner

Not to be confused with pair programming, Tom Breur and Michael Mahlberg advocate the use of pair writing in an article for AgileConnection. Just as two heads can sometimes be better than one in smart programming, the same can be said for writing. They explain how pair writing works for them. Double the Fun Granted, trying to shove more than one person together into the review process could result in some Three Stooges Syndrome, and …

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6 Reasons Why Agile Projects Fail

Perusing articles about project failure is like perusing the morning traffic report. They show you where all the closed roads are so you can save time by picking a different direction. In an article for Scrum Alliance, Sayi Sarat Chandra Parvatam spots six road blocks that end a well-intentioned agile project: Attempting the agile plan with inexperience Lack of orientation for cultural transition Disinterest from mid-level people Unidentified communication gap Lack of self-identification with the …

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What Rugby Can Teach You about Trust in Agile Teams

Ah, rugby, that sport that nobody in the United States cares about. In an article for AgileConnection, Luis Novella nonetheless explains how rugby can inspire agile teams. In the end, teams are all about trust, and rugby and agile have this in common. Trust in This Novella has a passion for rugby, which to him symbolizes unconditional “support, trust, respect, generosity, and courage,” though you can associate such qualities with any team sport of your …

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5 Reasons Why a Physical Scrum Board Rocks

Visualization takes complex ideas and reinterprets them in simpler ways. Scrum boards are a great example. In an article for Scrum Alliance, Reuben Salisbury explains why having a literal, physical scrum board in particular can be a great advantage to the team: It promotes collaboration and conversation. It is a focal point. It promotes transparency. It gets updated. It is more interactive and fun. Board with Work Salisbury fully understands how important a virtual scrum …

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5 Tips from Bose for Waterfall-to-Agile Transition

Waterfall is steadily going down the drain, and Bose recognizes it. In an article for TechTarget, Sue Troy talks to Bose CIO Rob Ramrath about how Bose has made the shift to agile over time, and what top tips they have to share from the experience: Build heterogeneous teams. Collocate all development team members. Determine KPIs to measure success. Take a multi-tiered approach to portfolio management. Work to integrate business project owners into the process. …

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