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Managing Globally Distributed Project Teams

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I started managing projects that included team members or customers outside the US in the mid-‘90s. In the beginning, it was one other country. Then two, and so on. These days, working with globally distributed project teams is my norm. A typical project will include people spread across five to 30 countries, three to five continents, and from three to seven time zones. As you would expect, it’s very different from managing a few folks clustered together in a cube farm. Preparations must begin before the first team meeting.

Working Calendars

It is important to be cognizant of the non-working days for the people in your team. Set up the holidays for each country in your project planning system—here is a list of commonly observed national and religious holidays for 2018, and here are instructions for updating the working calendar in Microsoft Project. In addition, ask your team members to record their planned vacation dates in a shared location—I usually just use an Excel spreadsheet, to keep the technical overhead down.

Time Zones

One of the biggest problems with working across oceans is the impact of time zones and the International Date Line on available windows for team meetings. Even if the organization adjusts working hours to get some alignment, it can be a burden for those who are always either getting up early or staying up late. Try to schedule meetings in a way that shares the burden. Also recognize that not everyone observes daylight saving time, and those that do don’t all change their clocks on the same day—Europe and North America are a week apart. And the Northern and Southern hemispheres are on completely different schedules. Here is an excellent resource for finding the current time and time zones of most of the large cities in the world, and here is their daylight saving time page.

Visibility into Workload Conflicts

Most globally distributed, cross-functional project teams include some number of people who have additional work responsibilities. The project will always be in competition with that other work, and you won’t necessarily know when priorities change. To avoid delays, maintain contact with your team member’s manager, or a proxy—someone who can act as a remote source of information and as an influencer, should that be necessary. Not all cultures will openly discuss doubts and conflicts, especially with a distant colleague. It is vital to have a way to identify and resolve conflicts, and getting a periodic pulse check from someone on site can make a huge difference.

A Common, Bland English

For most global organizations, English is the common language. That doesn’t mean everyone speaks or understands it fluently, and it certainly doesn’t mean that everyone is familiar with all the local idioms, slang, and cultural references. When on the phone, speak deliberately (but not too slowly), as it can be difficult to parse out similar-sounding words. Work to avoid misunderstanding by keeping your spoken communications as jargon-free and non-colloquial as possible. And try to take the edge off your regional accent—I work at sounding as much as possible like a “generic American,” without the drawl. I tried to raise this with a colleague from Houston a few years ago, who replied, “What accent?” Note that British, Australian, Canadian, Scottish, Irish, and New Zealand accents are just as real and just as hard on the ears as Indian or Texas English. Speak to be understood by your audience.

There are many resources available online that can help you build your Cultural Intelligence, and even if you aren’t managing global teams right now, you almost certainly will be before long. I learn more about how cultural differences impact work and communication with every project, but I generally find that if I assume people are doing their best until I have reason to doubt it, my life is a lot happier.

 

For more brilliant insights, check out Dave’s blog: The Practicing IT Project Manager

Are you involved in a data conversion project? Then check out Dave’s indispensable book: The Data Conversion Cycle

About Dave Gordon

Dave Gordon is a project manager with over twenty years of experience in implementing human capital management and payroll systems, including premises-based ERP solutions, like PeopleSoft and ADP Enterprise, and SaaS solutions, like Workday. He has an MS in IT with a concentration in project management, and a BS in Business. He also holds the project management professional (PMP) designation, as well as professional designations in human resources (GPHR and SPHR) and in benefits administration (CEBS). In addition to his articles and blog posts, he curates a weekly roundup of articles on project management, and he has authored or contributed to several books on project management. You can view his blog at The Practicing IT Project Manager by clicking the button below.

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