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3 Tips to Succeed as an Introverted Project Manager

IT harbors a workplace where the loudest people tend to get a lot of the credit. This doesn’t mean that you should change who you are as a person and start going on Wolf of Wall Street-esque tirades to get people to respect you. There are some things you can do to improve the way you lead so you can be effective while staying true to yourself. In an article for Project Times, Lee Grinberg shares three tips that can allow introverted project managers to shine:

  1. Be assertive in a way that works for you.
  2. Lead by example.
  3. Take credit for a job well done.

Skills to Succeed as an Introvert

Being an introvert means that you won’t feel the need to be constantly talking and carrying the discussion of a meeting. But if you are worried that your thoughtful silence will be interpreted as weakness by others, then Grinberg points out a way to keep yourself in control of the situation without having to blab through every meeting:

The solution to this is to have frequent one to one meetings with the company power brokers to update them on what’s going on with your project. In a one to one conversation, you are more likely to open up and will have the freedom to discuss things more openly. Once you do so, you will be seen as a thoughtful manager. The key here is to meet with the people that have power in your company. If they believe in you, then you will get the support you need, and other coworkers’ opinions of you will not matter that much.

This one-on-one conversation style also applies to meeting with team members individually. Being able to convey how you feel in a firm matter is what’s important here. Another important skill is to lead by example. By demonstrating that you can quietly get the job done without a big fuss, you show your coworkers that they can do the same. If you’re not physically there, periodically reminding them in emails and IMs would do roughly the same thing.

Once the project is all said and done, make sure everyone gets their due credit for the work they did on the project. You can do this by keeping a list of challenges the team faced and how you managed the team through them. In this way, you can broadcast your team’s success, and also your great leadership that made it possible.

You can view the original article here: https://www.projecttimes.com/articles/3-must-have-skills-for-the-introverted-project-manager.html

About Austin J. Gruver

Austin is a Staff Writer for AITS. He has a background in professional writing from York College.

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