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Organizational Project Business Management and PMOs: Executive View

Written with Darrel G. Hubbard

Introduction

During our PMO case study research over the past 13 years, we delved into the construct, organizational concept, and framework of Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM). In addition, we delved deeply into the models, framework, and organizational concepts of the Project Business Management Or­ganization (PBMO). We documented those research results in our latest book, A Compendium of PMO Case Studies – Volume II: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts {Bolles & Hubbard 2016}.

Organizational Project Business Management and its supporting and implementing Project/ Program/Portfolio Business Management Organization—or generically the Project Business Man­agement Organization—within major enterprises have become keys to business success, as illus­trated within our second set of eight PMO Case Studies {Bolles & Hubbard 2016}.

The discipline of Project Management has grown and matured during the past 65 years, and it has incorporated many aspects of general business management. That growth has facilitated the integration of the methodologies and processes of Project Management with those of Opera­tions Management that are related to the enterprise’s business management of its project-portfo­lios, project-programs, and projects. This integration led to the construction of the Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) framework. This evolution of OPBM has also made it nec­essary for the enterprise’s management to assume a direct role in the executive management of the implementation and desired functionality of OPBM and the associated Project Business Manage­ment Organization.

Organizational Management – General Concepts and Constructs in Business

Business Administration, as studied at colleges and universities and pursued within enterprises, is com­posed of multiple areas of management within an enterprise. The names of the most common management fields or disciplines include: Financial Management; Quality Management; Production Management; Man­ufacturing Management, Engineering Management, Information & Technology Management; Operations Management; Accounting Management; and Project Management. Each of these unique disciplines con­tains the requisite knowledge, skills, and means to govern, direct, supervise, manage, and control the con­duct, performance, and execution of the associated tasks and work within that management discipline.

Most major enterprises, those organizations created for a specific business purpose, employ most of those common fields of Business Administration. In addition, each of those management disciplines is implemented and deployed within an enterprise by a specific functional business-oriented organization—whose organizational-name usually reflects that discipline. Each of those functional organizations is created for the purpose of organizationally instituting that specific management discipline, on an enterprise-wide basis or division-wide basis. Which is to say, that each management discipline has an “Organizational Man­agement” aspect, which is employed to establish the requirements, design, implementation, and operational organizational strategy, for that specific management discipline, within each specific enterprise.

Organizational Accounting Management – An Analogy

Based upon the above constructs and concepts a general business oriented definition for Organizational “Insert a Discipline-Name” Management for any management discipline can be stated as follows: It is the framework of organizational strategies with requisite capabilities that utilizes a “Discipline-Name” Busi­ness-oriented Management Framework and a “Discipline-Name” Organization Model to provide the sys­tematic business-oriented management of an enterprise’s “Discipline-Name” specific tasks and work. Or­ganizational “Insert a Discipline-Name” Management organizationally facilitates the business-based iden­tification, selection, prioritization, and execution of “Discipline-Name” specific tasks and work to effec­tively and efficiently accomplish the enterprise’s strategic initiatives, and related business objectives—and to establish a sustainable competitive business posture and culture.

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Figure 1: Organizational Accounting Business Management – The Construct with Framework

The graphical representation of the construct and framework for Organizational Accounting Business Management is shown in Figure 1 above, and can be seen as an explicit analog for Organizational Project Business Management as shown in Figure 2 on Page 4. We use our term of Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) to emphasize the business aspects represented by the concept of organizational pro­ject management.

Organizational Accounting Business Management (OABM) always utilizes a functional organization, commonly titled as the Accounting Organization, to provide, implement, and maintain the necessary and associated accounting infrastructure within the enterprise.

The blue-clouded area, within the Venn-diagram of the OABM Framework of Figure 1 on Page 2, rep­resents the selection and integration of just those specific portions of all that is known about accounting management, about all the possible accounting organizational structures, and about all of the specific en­terprise’s operations organizations and operations management. It represents the specific subset that has been determined to be necessary and sufficient to define an enterprise’s specific implementation of Organ­izational Accounting Business Management and its related implementing Accounting Business Manage­ment Organization (ABMO).

Organizational Project Business Management – Concept and Construct

Organizational Project Management is a specific business management construct or concept just like Organizational Accounting Management, or any of the other management disciplines and provides specific business or technical services and support, on an enterprise-wide or division-wide basis. Therefore, Organ­izational Project Business Management (OPBM) can be defined, in business terms, as the framework of organizational strategies with requisite capabilities that utilizes a Project Business Management Framework and Project Business Management Organization Models to provide the systematic business-oriented man­agement of an enterprise’s project-portfolios, project-programs, and projects and related work. Figure 2, on Page 4, graphically illustrates this concept and construct for OPBM.

The discipline of Project Management, which underlays OPBM, is considered to be composed of three specific inter-related sub-disciplines or branches, to wit:

  • Managing projects, where a project is a temporary endeavor, having constraints, undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result;
  • Managing programs composed of projects and other related work, which includes identifying, pri­oritizing, authorizing, managing, monitoring, and controlling the included projects and other related work, to achieve the enterprise’s specific related strategic initiatives and business objectives and obtaining the associated benefits and value; and
  • Managing portfolios, which includes identifying, prioritizing, authorizing, managing, monitoring, and controlling the included projects, project-programs, and other related work.

In addition, the supporting management domains of Resource Management, Strategy Management, and Objectives Management must also be addressed when implementing Project Management on an enterprise-level or division-level within an enterprise. This is the concept we call Project Business Management (PBM).

Project Business Management (PBM), stated in business terms, is the business strategy and management framework, underlying Organizational Project Business Management, that drives the use of integrated gen­eral business management and project management knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques when applying project-portfolio, project-program, and project processes, methodologies, and procedures—within an en­terprise’s business context and structure—to meet or exceed stakeholder and customer needs. PBM is em­ployed within an enterprise to derive benefits from, and capture value through, any project-related actions and activities utilized to accomplish the enterprise’s strategic initiatives and related business objectives. We developed the concept of “Project Business Management” and created its acronym “PBM” {Bolles & Hub­bard 2007a and 2007b} to eliminate any confusion—and suppress the reader’s assumptions—as to what the generic term “project management” might mean to a reader, when we use it in a business context.

A key business purpose of Project Business Management is to achieve the enterprise’s strategic initia­tives and effectively accomplish the related business objectives, which are implemented via specific pro­jects, and thereby obtain the associated benefits and values that each project represents to the enterprise. OPBM organizationally facilitates this business-based identification, selection, prioritization, and execution of projects to effectively and efficiently accomplish the enterprise’s strategic initiatives, and related busi­ness objectives—and it is a key component of establishing a sustainable competitive business posture and culture within the enterprise and the PBMO.

The cube-like graphic on the right-hand side of Figure 2 is the model for our PBM construct. Similar to what was presented in Figure 1, the blue-clouded area, within the Venn-diagram of the OPBM Framework of Figure 2, represents the identification, selection, and integration of just those:

  • Specific components from all that is known about the project management discipline;
  • Specific organizational structures from all the possible project management organizational forms; and
  • Specific elements from all the enterprise’s operations management and operations organizations, which must interface and cooperate with each other and the Project Business Management Organi­zation.

It is that subset of management, organizational-structures, elements, and components, which is deter­mined as being necessary and sufficient to define an enterprise’s specific implementation of Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) and its related implementing Project Business Management Or­ganization (PBMO).

The enterprise must first establish its business-based strategies for instituting Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) and then define the capabilities that must either exist, or need to be ac­quired, to support those strategies. These actions include identifying the existing Organizational Process Assets that support the OPBM strategy and defining the missing Assets that must be created, prepared, or acquired and then implemented. The process of creating the enterprise’s specific OPBM Framework and PBM Model includes identifying the existing Enterprise Environmental Factors that support the enterprise’s established OPBM strategy and then defining the missing Factors that must be developed, cultivated, ame­liorated, or addressed.

Figure 2: Organizational Project Business Management – The Construct with Framework
Figure 2: Organizational Project Business Management – The Construct with Framework

Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) Role in OPBM

Organizational Project Business Management, as with Accounting Business Management, requires a functional organization reporting to the enterprise’s executive level to provide, implement, and maintain the necessary infrastructure of the project management discipline within the enterprise.

For OPBM, that functional organization is the Project Business Management Organization (PBMO). Within Organizational Project Business Management, the Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) is the organizational business function, inside the enterprise, that institutes and manages the Pro­ject Business Management processes and methodologies for project-portfolios, project-programs, and pro­jects. Positioned at the executive level of the enterprise or a division or major business-unit, it is the func­tional organization accountable for enterprise-wide development, distribution, and implementation of Or­ganizational Project Business Management.

The PBMO is a corporate business function, with a title and responsibility similar to traditional business functions—such as accounting, finance, information technology, etc.—that provides leadership and has ownership of its respective functional discipline {Hubbard & Bolles 2012 & 2016}. A chief project officer, who reports directly to a chief executive officer or a chief operating officer, leads the PBMO and is respon­sible for implementing and managing Project Business Management on an enterprise-wide basis.

Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) – Business Function and Role

Projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios are an enterprise’s strategic business investments. From a competitive financial perspective, enterprises can no longer afford to authorize, or fund, or execute any project without that project supporting a clear and controlling strategy. Projects and programs, and any related portfolios—as strategic business investments—must be properly managed. However, many busi­nesses are not necessarily managing them that way, because those enterprises are using a traditional man­agement approach for projects, programs, and portfolios—that primarily relies on a basic project-centric execution-orientated methodology. This limited approach is not only inefficient and ineffective from a busi­ness management perspective, but also puts the business benefits and values, that enterprise requires, at risk.

Most business executives realize that effective management of their projects has a measurable impact on their enterprise’s bottom line. Those executives understand—that to confront the growing pressures from widespread competition and the global economy—they must correct their misapplication of limited re­sources, sub-optimization of business processes, and lack of cross-organizational integration. They seek business transformation and innovation that goes beyond top-down analytical methods and hierarchical structures.

Those executives are embracing the lessons of design thinking, project business analysis, humanistic management, process management, and systems theory. These managers also know that in an increasingly solution-focused business culture, each project, project-program, and project-portfolio must be positioned to provide business solutions, as well as being delivery focused. This then leads to the executives and their business unit leaders recognizing that they are dependent upon the proper application of specific business, portfolio, program, and project management processes for business success.

To address these points, many enterprises now employ a more pragmatic and flexible structured business approach called Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM). Project Business Management is applied through the use of OPBM, which itself is implemented and applied using a Project Business Man­agement Organization (PBMO). This allows enterprises to gain business leverage over, and control the distribution of, authorized enterprise resources that support a multitude of corporate, divisional, and depart­mental portfolios, programs, and projects—thereby effectively managing their projects, programs, and re­lated project-centric business portfolios. Those project-portfolios, project-programs, and projects cover the range from research and development, capital expansion, new product lines, modified products, and mainte­nance, to extensive process improvements.

Organizational Project Business Management can be viewed as the key management framework through which an enterprise directs and controls its project related business, operational tactics, and strategic activ­ities. OPBM is also the means by which an enterprise responds to the desires, expectations, and legitimate rights of its stakeholders and customers through the use and management of projects, programs, and port­folios. Therefore, enterprises are adopting an OPBM approach, which integrates the:

  • Project-portfolio/project-program/project management processes and best practices;
  • Organizational project management processes and best practices; and
  • Enterprise’s business management processes and best practices.

To put it a bit differently, our research shows Organizational Project Business Management, when im­plemented, drives executive management to ask questions that go deeper than “Is this project important?” and instead to venture “Is this project actually going to make a difference to or within our enterprise?” OPBM requires executives to:

  • Develop an understanding of the values and benefits each project is expected to bring;
  • Ascertain if that project actually supports an executive-management established strategic initiative and related specific business objectives; and
  • Institutionalize Project Business Management organizations, methodologies, and processes to actu­alize desired benefits and values.

Thus, enterprises looking for answers to meet the challenges of the global market or their regional markets have discovered a key answer is to implement Organizational Project Business Management. For OPBM to be inculcated across the enterprise, the enterprise’s long-term business policy, vision, and mission for Organizational Project Business Management must be explicitly defined and must cover the establish­ment and use of the Project Business Management Organization. For OPBM to be successfully imple­mented it has to be formally mandated by executive management.

Project Business Management Organization’s Role in OPBM

Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) requires a formal organizational function to per­form its implementation and sustain its application. That function is known as the Project Business Man­agement Organization (PBMO). It should be noted that a PMO isn’t an office. The term project manage­ment office is an archaic remnant from the field-site offices employed by the engineering and construction profession. The PMO is, in business actuality, an organization within an enterprise. An office is only a physical location associated with an enterprise where a person can go—whereas an organization performs a business purpose within that enterprise {Hubbard & Bolles 2014 and 2015}.

The purpose of the PBMO in Organizational Project Business Management development and imple­mentation—when utilizing an integrated project management approach across the enterprise—is to design, develop, and deploy a common project management governance, methodology, and processes for OPBM implementation that will ensure project, program, and portfolio success. This implementation by PBMOs—within a business context and on an enterprise-wide or division-wide basis—of the practices and processes of the project management discipline, is shown to keep enterprise strategic initiatives on track in a wide array of industries.

The single ownership of the business-oriented PBMO, at the executive-level of the enterprise, must be established to implement Organizational Project Business Management. This increased executive-level ownership of the planning, implementation, and on-going management of an enterprise’s PBMO is sup­ported by our PMO case studies {Bolles & Hubbard 2012 and 2016}. Two specific reasons are:

  • The establishment of common project management processes and practices across an enterprise, as embodied within the construct of Organizational Project Business Management, and gaining enter­prise-wide adoption at all levels is difficult—if not impossible—without first establishing exclusive ownership of the PBMO at the enterprise’s corporate level.
  • Positioning the PBMO within the top of the enterprise’s hierarchical organizational structure estab­lishes its autonomy and thus “ownership” for setting up, distributing, supporting, and managing the application of OPBM.

Our research shows the deployment of a PBMO has become a primary business and organizational func­tion to implement OPBM. PBMOs are not only being utilized to successfully initiate and manage projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios, but also to solve the larger business issues associated with those projects, programs, and portfolios. The PBMO provides support to executive management in the business management planning process that converts the current and future needs of the enterprise into business plans and business cases. It is also instrumental in transforming those business plans and cases into strategic initiatives.

Operations Management and Project Management must coexist and cooperate within the enterprise’s organizational structure and must support the various business aspects and strategies of the enterprise. OPBM through a PBMO can integrate the role of project management into the enterprise’s business oper­ations and can explicitly address implementing strategic initiatives, tactical objectives, business require­ments, and stakeholder needs; thereby, supporting the Organizational Project Business Management con­struct.

The Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) is an integral part of the organizational-based management philosophies called Project Business Management (PBM) {Bolles & Hubbard 2007a and 2014} and Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) {Bolles & Hubbard 2016}. These con­structs place project management and its associated functional organizations within the overall management arena of the business enterprise and its operations. In this context of business management, the enterprise-level PBMO can be understood as a corporate business-unit function, with a title and responsibility similar to traditional business functions—such as finance, engineering, marketing, sales, manufacturing, infor­mation-technology, etc.—which provide leadership and have ownership of their respective functional dis­ciplines. Five other types of project management organizations {described in Hubbard & Bolles 2015} are:

  • Division-Level PBMO
  • Business-Unit PBMO
  • Project Management Center of Excellence (PMCoE)
  • Basic Project Business Management Organization (PBMO)
  • Project & Program Support Organization (PSO)

These various organizations perform and oversee the management of projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios as applicable within a given enterprise. The relationships among these PBMO types can be complex, multilayered, and as varied as the combination of industries and enterprises and their associated organizational, cultural, and political contexts, as evidenced by the eight PBMO organizational structured described in our second set of PMO case studies {Bolles & Hubbard 2016}, and as illustrated in Figure 3 on Page 8. However, each actual configuration within an enterprise supports that enterprise’s spe­cific implementation and application of Organizational Project Business Management.

The deployment of a Project/Program/Portfolio Business Management Organization (PBMO) at the en­terprise’s executive-level—to implement Organizational Project Business Management—has, for many enterprises, become an important business and organizational methodology for successfully achieving de­sired business results in their management of projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios. OPBM utilizes the Enterprise-PBMO as the centralized business function, within the enterprise, to manage the requisite project management business practices, processes, and support services. This functional group is staffed with experts skilled in providing those services, and:

  • Reports to an executive management level position independent of other functional groups;
  • Provides support directly to portfolio, program and project managers and their staff, or provides the managers from within the Enterprise PMO staff;
  • Is responsible for developing, implementing, and monitoring the consistent application of a Project Business Management Methodology across the enterprise; and
  • Integrates the application of portfolio, program, and project management business practices with the operational business practices throughout the enterprise, through coaching, mentoring, and training.
Figure 3: Various Structuring of PBMOs to Implement OPBM
Figure 3: Various Structuring of PBMOs to Implement OPBM

Project Business Management Organizations are now effectively and successfully addressing a wide range of business and organizational challenges associated with implementing and operating Organizational Project Business Management, which include:

  • Managing the associated organizational changes inherent in implementing OPBM;
  • Improving communications and collaborative cooperation among business units:
  • Dealing with complexity;
  • Managing changes in projects, project-programs and project-portfolios;
  • Establishing project management as a core competency;
  • Enhancing project management competency and maturity;
  • Managing and balancing project related risk;
  • Applying Agile project management practices;
  • Supporting executive management in maintaining market competitiveness; and
  • Maintaining the sustainability of OPBM.

PBMO Implementation of OPBM

Enterprises have addressed specific opportunities to improve the alignment of their planning and execu­tion of corporate strategies and objectives with the enterprise’s mission and vision, by employing OPBM and using executive-level PBMOs. A sample Organizational Project Business Management implementa­tion—showing some typical organizational functions and management capabilities that could be undertaken by an Enterprise-PBMO—is shown in Figure 4 below:

The establishment of the Enterprise-Level PBMO, as well as the Division-level and Business-Unit PBMOs, based upon our PBM framework and PBMO models, has been shown to provide a solid foundation to proactively address impediments and organizational challenges to implementing OPBM—and to estab­lish and uniformly apply Project Business Management governance, leadership, standards, and methodol­ogies (processes, procedures, and techniques) in the application of OPBM {Bolles & Hubbard 2012, 2014, and 2016}.

Figure 4: Typical OPBM Organizational Functions and Management Capabilities
Figure 4: Typical OPBM Organizational Functions and Management Capabilities

To be a PBMO, that organization must be a unique business function within its enterprise, and not be an add-on to an existing function or department. Of our seven identified types of PMO models {Hubbard & Bolles 2015} only four meet the full definition of a PBMO. Moreover, only two of those are effective on an enterprise-wide and enterprise-level basis in implementing Organizational Project Business Manage­ment. This means:

  • PBMOs located below the enterprise or division level have little influence on an enterprise-wide basis;
  • Project Support Organizations as well as Project Management Centers of Excellence do not manage projects and consequently they are not actually a PBMO;
  • Project Management Centers of Excellence are of value for developing and disseminating OPBM company-standardized project management practices at any level where they are used. However, the actual effective application and enforcement of those practices and process requires a PBMO at the enterprise, division, or major business unit level;
  • PBMOs employed on a major/critical project are effective, but have little long-term influence on an enterprise-wide basis; and
  • PBMOs located at the Business Unit level are effective within the business unit, but lack the strategic and tactical aspects needed to have an influence on the enterprise outside of the Business Unit.

In summary, the PBMOs that can have an influence enterprise-wide are those established at the enter­prise-level or division-level. Only these two PBMOs have led to enterprise-wide quantifiable improvements in the Organizational Project Business Management of an enterprise’s projects, project-programs, and/or project-portfolios. Of the two, the Enterprise-PBMO is more likely to be successful and beneficial to the overall enterprise than the Division-PBMO.

An enterprise’s executive management needs to address and manage the planning, development, and implementation of Organizational Project Business Management and its supporting Project Business Man­agement Organization as a major-project or as a project-program, depending on how management views the scope and complexity of instituting OPBM within its enterprise. The processes and methodologies rec­ommended in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge and/or the Program Management Standard, both issued by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), can be used to effectively perform the implementation of OPBM on an enterprise-wide, or division-wide, or business unit-wide basis.

Developing, implementing, and instituting Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) and establishing a supporting, sustainable, and successful PBMO is a significant business undertaking. Your enterprise needs to address this development task in a strategic manner. A basic understanding of the OPBM construct and Project Business Management (PBM), as shown in Figure 2 on Page 4, and the PBM Organ­ization is also a requirement in initiating the development work for OPBM to be sustainable.

Sustainability and Viability of OPBM and the PBMO – Benefits and Values

Every functioning organizational unit within an enterprise, whether it is overhead consuming, such as accounting and marketing, or it is profit generating, such as a production line products or sales and services, must be shown to have benefit and value to the enterprise. Therefore, for Organizational Project Business Management to be sustainable and for the PBMO to be a viable and sustainable functional organization, the enterprise must identify the desired requisite values and benefits, define the associated performance indicators, and document those within the business-case for OPBM. And, then the enterprise must explicitly measure and prove that the PBMO and the OPBM implementations have delivered those benefits and val­ues. The following business actions are being taken by various PBMOs in our PMO Case Studies to estab­lish their economic worth and sustain their existence {Bolles & Hubbard 2016}:

  • Select, prioritize, and initiate only projects supporting strategic initiatives and business objectives;
  • Direct the distribution of enterprise funds and resources, while assuring those funds and resources are effectively distributed and applied across the enterprise to only those projects that support strate­gic initiatives and business objectives. This gives those projects, from their start, the best opportunity to succeed;
  • Assess multiple categories of risk, including technical, project delivery, and operational risk. Priori­tize and document identified risks and develop control strategies for higher-level risks;
  • Identify and document non-performing projects and cancel each non-performing project, or place the project work on hold;
  • Identify and document changes in business strategy, budgeted funds available, or requirements and establish the associated effects on projects-in-progress. Then re-prioritize or place on hold affected projects and portfolios;
  • Develop and then measure PBMO selected key performance indicators for: each strategic initiative, each business objective, each project-portfolio, each project-program, and each project of any signif­icance;
  • Report upon, and take corrective action as necessary for, each PBMO selected key performance in­di­cator;
  • Formally and routinely, communicate the measured value, identified benefits, and financial impacts to the enterprise’s executive management;
  • Develop and maintain PBMO support of, and support for, operations organizations and foster inter-organizational collaborative cooperation;
  • Develop and issue policy, vision, and mission statements for the Project Business Management Or­ganization; and
  • Prepare and issue a business case for the Project Business Management Organization.

Five other major factors can also ensure the sustainability of cost effective Project Business Manage­ment. Those occur when executives are committed to the ownership and support of those factors, which are:

  • Integrated business management and project management disciplines;
  • Integrated business management and project/program/portfolio related processes;
  • Maturity of the integrated project business management processes; and
  • Maturity and competency of the enterprise’s management in applying those processes; and
  • Sustaining the Project Business Management Organization and Organizational Project Business Man­agement.

Our research also shows that when implementing a sustainable PBMO, many—enterprise-specific or­ganizational, sociological, functional, cultural, process, business, and managerial—impediments have to be addressed in order for Organizational Project Business Management to be sustainable and for the PBMO to be a viable and sustainable functional organization. Addressing and resolving these impediments requires cooperation among, and across, all the organizational elements of the enterprise.

A common question asked by managers who are working to implement a project management organi­zation is: “How do we justify to executive management the implementation of a project management or­ganization, since it is an overhead-cost as a functional organization?” The answer is the same for any over­head-cost function. The economic worth of the benefits and value generated or provided by the work per­formed by the functional organization must match or exceed the overhead-costs generated by that same organization.

In addition, when an enterprise’s accounting system is properly designed, a significant amount of costs can be direct charged to projects/programs/portfolios by those individuals working on a particular pro­ject/program/portfolio. Operating organizations within many enterprises have the costs of their projects and programs buried within that operating unit’s budget, but the actual work is not being direct charged to any specific project or program. This allows that operating unit to not have to actually show what a particular project or program cost. Thus, they hide from executive management the real costs of their inefficiencies and ineffectiveness in performing project management.

Therefore, a business case for the PMO must be prepared and approved, which explicitly addresses the economic worth to be provided by a sustainable PMO and shines a business-light on all the costs across the enterprise associated with performing all tasks related to project/program/portfolio management.

Executive and senior management stakeholder’s acceptance of the proposed value to be added by, and benefits to be obtained from, Organizational Project Business Management can be difficult, especially when resulting values or benefits reduce costs and staffing in some areas, but increase the workload in other areas. Successful delivery of business value and benefits realization requires a collaborative approach to OPBM, which is a key role for the Project Business Management Organization to play enterprise-wide. To meet the strategic needs of the business, OPBM must be truly cross-functional, not just address the needs of the PBMO functional business unit. Successfully implementing OPBM and obtaining the related business value and benefits requires:

  • Cooperative collaboration enterprise-wide;
  • Focus on business processes versus technology;
  • A clear strategy answering the How, What, Where, When, and Why of the business value and benefits to be realized from OPBM; and
  • Open-lines of communications among functional organizations.
Figure 5: Typical Organizational Project Business Management Maturity and PBMO Path
Figure 5: Typical Organizational Project Business Management Maturity and PBMO Path

Establishing a sustainable OPBM and PBMO is not a trivial pursuit. It requires total commitment by executive management and acceptance at all levels of the enterprise. It takes time and a tenacity to pursue the goal regardless of any obstacles or criticism. The longer-term values and benefits, which an enterprise derives from implementing Organizational Project Business Management, are also determined by both the maturity and capability of its Project Business Management (PBM) organizational governance, manage­ment personnel, policies, methodologies, plans, processes, and procedures. Those capabilities identify, plan, communicate, implement, control, and accomplish the enterprise’s business strategic initiatives and related business objectives. A typical enterprise-level PBMO maturity evolution, in implementing and ma­turing OPBM and the PBMO, is shown above in Figure 5.

OPBM Delivered Business Benefits – Benefits Realization

Organizational Project Business Management addresses the business related shortcomings in the disci­pline of Project Management as generally practiced, and eliminates related inefficiencies and ineffective­ness by incorporating critical business oriented planning and control methodologies for projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios. OPBM supports the enterprise’s management of investments, in addition to the management of its projects, programs, and portfolios. This additional focus on Project Business Management incorporates strategic planning, tactical planning, and the management of strategic enterprise investments. Each of these OPBM actions benefits the overall enterprise.

The underlying strategic business objectives of implementing Organizational Project Business Manage­ment (OPBM) are to derive business benefits from, and to also capture value through, any pro­ject/program/portfolio-related actions and activities used to accomplish the enterprise’s strategic business initiatives and related business objectives. And, to meet or exceed customer and stakeholder needs, require­ments, and expectations. OPBM helps enterprises realize a number of other operational business benefits. The following five operational benefits, in and of themselves, may provide sufficient basic justification within a business case for creating and then implementing an organizational-strategy for Organizational Project Business Management:

  • Institutionalization of Project Business Management Principles and Practices: The enterprise-level PBMO, through its implementation of Organizational Project Business Management, becomes the functional owner of: 1) Project Business Management development, implementation, and monitor­ing; 2) the continuous application and improvement of the related PBM policies, processes, and pro­cedures enterprise-wide; and 3) streamlining manual processes and integrating critical project-related manage­ment data across the enterprise.
  • Providing a Global View and Control of the Enterprise’s Strategic Initiatives and Associated Port­folios, Programs, and Projects: OPBM establishes an environment where all planned project-related enterprise initiatives can easily be summarized and rolled up across the enterprise to provide a single global view. Having a global view, of the status of planned initiatives and portfolios, programs, and projects in-progress, available to all management is critical to the strategic and tactical planning pro­cesses and executive management’s control.
  • Optimization of Resource Usage, Both Human and Materiel: OPBM provides management an in-depth familiarity with, and a clear view into, all projects, programs, and portfolios. Hence, OPBM supports efficient resource leveling and optimization, allocating resources based on availability and fit, and the freeing up of resources on an enterprise-wide basis.
  • Making Project Management and Control Robust and Routinely Available Enterprise-Wide: OPBM provides this capability, because it makes the enterprise-level PBMO the focal point that regularly gathers, analyzes, monitors, and reports the current status on all projects, programs, and portfolios. And, the PBMO also turns that information into vital project-related financial data. With this in­creased visibility and insight, the enterprise-level PBMO supports the enterprise’s management in:
    • Making better decisions with respect to projects/programs/portfolios;
    • Rebalancing portfolios and programs to align execution with strategy;
    • Identifying and realizing business value; and
    • Extending investment management concepts enterprise-wide into the management of projects, programs, and portfolios.
  • Instituting Value Management within the Discipline of Project Management: OPBM is built on a value management philosophy that answers these questions: What is driving the intended value for the strategic initiative? What kinds of abilities and outcomes are required to achieve the value objectives?

Enterprises today are focused on a more holistic determination of project results with an emphasis on the business benefits those projects are planned to provide. Executives are concerned with how investments in projects/programs/portfolios are oriented with business-based metrics and affect the enterprise’s operations. To become effective in benefits realization, enterprises must shift the focus of their PBMOs from a tactical focus on project execution and details to strategic alignment with the enterprise’s strategic initiatives and business objectives, which are centered on business results. Obtaining the business results, promised by the benefits expected from projects/programs/portfolios, begins with well-defined strategic initiatives, refined descriptions of related business objectives, and an established OPBM governance structure.

Achieving broad management buy-in for OPBM across the enterprise requires establishing a baseline understanding of what is initially necessary regarding process and organizational changes to determine the level of support required to achieve the desired level of benefits that will be delivered when undertaking the change to OPBM. Implementing and measuring the resulting benefits of new OPBM processes also requires changing some existing business processes, which requires involvement and coordination with all business stakeholders to obtain realistic results.

One of the requirements for investing in an Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) framework implementation is to ensure those investments deliver real business benefits to the enterprise. OPBM benefits realization planning necessitates establishing clearly defined business goals for OPBM, an organized approach to instituting OPBM, and measurable and quantifiable OPBM benefits metrics that are concentrated on enterprise-wide project business management process-improvements. Achieving account­ability in delivering the benefits identified to be delivered through instituting OPBM requires that manage­ment ascertain and validate that those desired benefits are both reasonable and in-line with the enterprise’s stated business objectives. Establishing consensus on OPBM benefits metrics and measurements ensures that executive leaders and senior managers are engaged in the selection process for those benefit metrics and measurements. The enterprise should consider establishing an OPBM/PBMO benefits committee to review and corroborate results by comparing then against the issued OPBM business case. Communicating the resulting benefits of business investments in OPBM back to the enterprise’s executive management through an independent committee is highly important to maintain the PBMO as a viable functional organ­ization.

Our PBMO model migrates enterprises beyond the fundamentals of project management to where they can realize the maximum business benefits from managing projects/programs/portfolios. The following steps identify information that is required to qualify, quantify, and deliver the benefits an enterprise desires to be realized by investing in a project/program/portfolio:

  • Develop benefit classifications: cost reduction, profit increase, revenue generation, risk reduction, productivity improvement, workforce efficiency, customer requirement, industry regulation, govern­ment regulation, market expansion, product improvement, etc.;
  • Describe and document each business objective or business issue to be addressed;
  • Document what specific actions or changes caused a business issue to be noticed;
  • Describe the business rationale behind the business objective or business issue to be addressed;
  • Document the possible types of changes required to eliminate future occurrences of the business issue;
  • Identify the type of benefit—financial, non-financial, tangible, or intangible—to be realized by ac­complishing the business objective or mitigating the identified issue;
  • List any significant risks to the realization of the benefits and what actions could be taken to mitigate those risk;
  • Identify any issues and opportunities potentially affecting benefits realization;
  • Include benefit measurement metrics as agreed upon by the benefits steering committee or applicable governance body;
  • List all assumptions related to benefits realization;
  • Identify how each measureable benefit will be monitored, including applicable reports, frequency, data collection, and reporting responsibilities;
  • Identify an executive manager who will be the owner and accountable for the benefit realization;
  • State how a project or program or portfolio can accomplish the business objective or solve or mitigate the issue;
  • Describe how the project or program or portfolio can provide measureable improvement and business benefits;
  • Identify all dependencies with other project / programs / processes / systems affecting benefit reali­zation;
  • Manage the risks, issues, and opportunities potentially affecting the realization of benefits; and
  • Document any key steps related to the completion of the benefit deliverable, any alignment of benefit reporting related to project implementation milestones, and the handover of further benefit realization to the enterprise’s operating organizations.

OPBM Delivered Business Value – Value Realization

As noted in the section above, an underlying strategic business objective of implementing Organiza­tional Project Business Management (OPBM) is to capture value through any project/program/ portfolio-related actions and activities used to accomplish the enterprise’s strategic business initiatives and related business objectives. Value realization, within the project business management context, can be defined as the business value captured/extracted/generated through the execution of projects/programs/ portfolios and the associated project business management processes, which becomes the economic value added to, or retained by, the enterprise. This realization of value can be seen as at least optimizing, if not increasing, the return on investments (ROI) made by the enterprise in its projects/programs/portfolios and in the operation of its Organizational Project Business Management.

Within the construct of Organizational Project Business Management, business value realization is a basic precept, which when applied leads to:

  • Operating project business management processes more efficiently and effectively;
  • Adopting and implementing project business management processes technologies and systems that promote efficiency and provide solutions;
  • Providing more product or service value to customers;
  • Increasing the capabilities from existing processes, services, systems, and products to increase the enterprise’s customer base and profitability;
  • Ensuring products produced and services delivered meet or exceed the requirements of the strategic initiative that led to their creation; and
  • Creating or enhancing valued relationship with sponsors, stakeholders, and customers.

The implementation of Organizational Project Business Management is a significant organizational transformational change project or change program, and for change to be successful, value realization must be a front-end business driver in implementing OPBM. Quantifying the value, which is the return on in­vestment, expected from implementing Organizational Project Business Management, needs to be a pri­mary objective during the planning stages of the enterprise’s global strategic initiative for OPBM.

To measure the realization of value from instituting OPBM and operating a PBMO requires clearly defined Key Performance Indicators (KPI) within a baseline of performance measures, which are needed to identify any solution modifications as the OPBM implementation and change processes evolve. Other business processes may require modifications to allow the KPI measurement of the new OPBM processes. Establishing these key KPI measures requires management across the enterprise to have a clear understand­ing of OPBM. Sponsor and stakeholder acceptance, of the defined value added, is required to support the value added KPI measurement results. Stakeholder and sponsor collaboration is an absolute necessity when undertaking OPBM driven organizational changes to achieve maximum business value realization. Execu­tive stakeholders at all levels of the enterprise must to be involved and committed to supporting the efforts required to make the specified changes in organizational structures and processes to assure realization of the value from implementing OPBM.

Conclusions

Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) is a business management-construct employing an executive-led Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) to perform the application and im­plementation of a Project Business Management Framework on an enterprise-wide basis. Enterprises that establish OPBM as their business model for project management consistently maintain a broader view of managing projects/programs/portfolios, which ensures projects more effectively achieve and deliver true enterprise focused business value and benefits.

Our PMO research {Bolles & Hubbard 2012} and OPBM associated research {Bolles & Hubbard 2016} utilized an extensive copyrighted questionnaire—which is based upon the co-authors’ Project Busi­ness Management (PBM©) framework, their related Project Business Management Organization (PBMO©) models, and their generic construct of Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM). Those OPBM and PBMO business constructs are based upon our Project Business Management (PBM) Frame­work and Model—which, in Figure 2 on Page 4, is illustrated in the right most cube-graphic {Bolles & Hubbard 2012, 2014 and 2016}.

That research shows the operation of an Enterprise-PBMO or a Division-PBMO or a Business Unit-PBMO reflecting our Project Business Management (PBM) Framework and Organizational Project Busi­ness Management (OPBM) Framework can lead, and has led, to enterprise-wide quantifiable improvements in the management of an enterprise’s project-portfolios, project-programs, and projects. However, only the Enterprise Portfolio/Program/Project Business Management Organization (PBMO)—which, we call the Enterprise-PBMO—has actually demonstrated the capability to fully deliver the enterprise-wide business results desired from the business initiatives in the enterprise’s strategic plan, and has assured the successful implementation of Organizational Project Business Management. Our second set of PMO Case Studies {Bolles & Hubbard 2016} show, that of those Enterprise-PBMOs:

  • 100% are functioning at the enterprise-wide level, and report to a senior executive;
  • 100% have firmly established their positions within their organizations as providing benefits and value;
  • 100% have demonstrated their Enterprise-PBMO and Organizational Project Business Management are sustainable within their enterprise, and have developed plans to remain sustainable;
  • 100% have senior executive support; and
  • 100% have a clear vision and created a plan identifying what needs to be done to rise to the next level.

Our research shows the deployment at the enterprise’s executive-level of the Project/Program/Portfolio Business Management Organization (PBMO) has become a key business and organizational methodology for:

  • Effectively implementing Organizational Project Business Management; and
  • Successfully obtaining the enterprise’s desired business results, benefits, and values from the man­agement of its projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios.

Organizational Project Business Management is used to change the organization’s culture by shaping and embedding the requirements for value and benefits delivery throughout and across the entire enterprise. This is done by establishing a connection between higher-ranking strategic initiatives and business case goals to improve the realization of benefits and a higher return on investment and thereby deliver the desired value. Accomplishing this requires management to maintain a focus on value and benefits realization as a part of the enterprise’s OPBM business related processes.

Our research and recent PMO case studies related to PBMOs and OPBM also show that many Enter­prise-PBMOs, with various PBMO structures, are being successfully employed to solve larger business management issues. And, PBMOs are implementing OPBM to explicitly address strategic initiatives, tac­tical objectives, business requirements, and stakeholder needs associated with projects and the related chal­lenges affecting organizational changes. In addition, our PMO research indicates there is no single business view of Organizational Project Business Management or the Project Management discipline—or a single form of an associated PBMO implementation—which allows an enterprise to solve the larger issues pre­sented when managing projects, programs, and/or portfolios to achieve benefits, value, and profits.

Executives and senior managers must explicitly drive, and be involved in, establishing Organizational Project Business Management, and its related implementing Project Business Management Organization. Our research shows that successfully employing Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) and a Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) on an enterprise-wide basis requires executive management to formally set forth the enterprise’s business case for OPBM, which must include the long-term business-based policy, vision, and mission for both OPBM and the PBMO. These OPBM and PBMO documents need to be approved by the enterprise’s board of directors, and be issued by the chief executive officer. These documents promote the production of the values and benefits the enterprise desires to obtain from the execution and implementation of its projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios, while min­imizing negative inter-organizational politics and optimizing inter-organizational cooperation and collabo­ration. An enterprise’s set of OPBM and PBMO business case, vison, mission, and policy statements are also indicative of an enterprise’s value system—its beliefs about employee behavior, its concepts of com­munity, and its professional responsibility. What an enterprise espouses establishes how the enterprise is perceived by its employees, customers, suppliers, regulators, shareholders, stakeholders, and community. {Hubbard & Bolles 2016g and 2016j}.

The implementation of Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) by a Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) has arrived as a permanent business management and organizational approach to establishing and operating Project Business Management as a unique business management function within large, forward-looking enterprises. Our research shows that Enterprise-PBMOs performing as an independent business function, on an enterprise-wide basis, can transform an enterprise by improving bottom line returns and increasing stakeholder benefits and value derived from the enterprise’s projects, project-programs, and project-portfolios.

In the near future, OPBM will become a business force, and the Enterprise-PBMO will be a permanent senior-executive-level organization, within all enterprises that either are, or want to be, competitive within their business sphere—regardless of their size or type of business (profit, non-profit, governmental, or global service).

 

Dennis Bolles will be presenting a free webinar with ITMPI on March 22! Sign up here: Organizational Project Business Management and PMOs: Executive View

References

Bolles, D. L. & Hubbard, D. G. (2007a). Success – A Project Business Management Methodology Model Provides the Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management. Paper; Proceedings of Project Management Institute Global Congress 2007 North American Congress, October 2007; Atlanta, GA.

Bolles, D. L. & Hubbard, D. G. (2007b). The Power of Enterprise-Wide Project Management. New York, NY: AMACOM.

Bolles, D. L. & Hubbard, D. G. (2009). Creating a Sustainable PMO for Achieving Effective Business Results – Project Management Institute Greek Congress Keynote Address; Athens, Greece; November 2009; Published in Projects & Profits Magazine; December 2009; The Icfai University Press, Rs. 60; Panjaguttal Hyderbad, India.

Bolles, D.L. & Hubbard, D.G. (2012). A Compendium of PMO Case Studies: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – Volume I. Holland, MI: PBMconcepts.

Bolles, D. L. & Hubbard, D. G. (2014). The Power of Enterprise PMOs and Enterprise-Wide Project Management (Paperback – Revised 1st edition). Holland, MI: PBMconcepts.

Bolles, D.L. & Hubbard, D.G. (2016). A Compendium of PMO Case Studies: Reflecting Project Business Management Concepts – Volume II. Holland, MI: PBMconcepts.

Hobbs, B. (June 2007). The Multi-Project PMO: A Global Analysis of the Current State of Practice, Project Man­agement Institute (PMI) Website (www.pmi.org).

Hubbard, D. G. (2005). Policies, Plans, and Procedures – Profit Makers or Profit Takers. Paper; Proceedings of Project Management Institute Global Congress North American, September 2005, Toronto, Ontario (Canada).

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2008). Incorporating Strategies and Tactics into Project Business Management. Paper; Proceedings of Project Management Institute Global Congress North American, October 2008, Denver, CO.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2012). Executive PMO – Blending Project Management and Business Management. Paper; 6th Annual University of Texas at Dallas, Project Management Symposium Proceedings; Dallas, Texas. Paper; Proceedings of Project Management Institute Global Congress, 2012, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Article; (December 2012). PM World Journal, Volume I (Issue V), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2013). The Elephant in the Executive Suite – Project Management and the PMO. Paper; 7th Annual University of Texas at Dallas, Project Management Symposium Proceedings; Dallas, Texas. Paper; Proceedings of Project Management Institute Global Congress, 2013, New Orleans, LA. Article; (March 2014). PM World Journal, Volume III (Issue III), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2014). PMO Framework and PMO Models for Project Business Management. Paper; 8th Annual University of Texas at Dallas, Project Management Symposium Proceedings; Dallas, Texas. Paper; Proceedings of Project Management Institute Global Congress, 2014 Phoenix, AZ. Article; (January 2015). PM World Journal, Volume IV (Issue I), from www.pm-worldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2015). PMOs of Today and Tomorrow. Paper; 9th Annual University of Texas at Dallas, Project Management Symposium Proceedings; Dallas, Texas. Article; (December 2015). PM World Journal, Volume IV (Issue XII), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016a). Organizational Project Business Management and PMOs – Executive View. Paper; 10th Annual University of Texas at Dallas, Project Management Symposium Proceedings; Dallas, Texas.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016b). PMO Framework and PMO Models for Project Business Management. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (January 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue I), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016c). PMOs an Executive Office View. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (February 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue II), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016d). The Enterprise PMO as a Business Organization. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (March 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue III), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016e). Enterprise-Wide Project Management and the PMO as Business Concepts. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (April 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue IV), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016f). The Enterprise PMO in Operations Business Management. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (May 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue V), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016g). Setting Policy and Establishing the Charter for the Enterprise PMO. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (June 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue VI), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016h). Role of the Enterprise PBMO in Managing Project-Portfolios, Project Pro­grams, and Projects. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (July 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue VII), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016i). Enterprise-Wide Project Business Management Methodologies and the PMO. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (August 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue VIII), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Hubbard, D. G. & Bolles, D. L. (2016j). Establishing Vision, Mission, and Policies for Organizational Project Business Management (OPBM) and the Enterprise-Level Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) – Executive Overview. Article in Series on Project Business Management and the PMO; (October 2016). PM World Journal, Volume V (Issue X), from www.pmworldjournal.net.

Ibbs, W. (2002). Quantifying the Value of Project Management. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute.

Kerzner, H. (2001). Strategic Planning For Using a Project Management Maturity Model. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Letavec, C.J. (2006). The Program Management Office – Establishing, Managing, and Growing the Value of a PMO. Fort Lauderdale, FL: J. Ross Publishing, Inc.

Letavec, C. & Bolles, D. (Editors). (2010). The PMOSIG Program Management Office Handbook – Strategic and Tactical Insights for Improving Results. Fort Lauderdale, FL: J. Ross Publishing, Inc.

Project Management Institute. (2007). Project Manager Competency Development (PMCD) Framework. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute (PMI).

Rad, P. & Levin, G. (2006). The Advanced Project Management Office – A Comprehensive Look at Function and Implementation. Boca Raton, FL: St. Lucie Press.

Schnapper, M. & Rollins, S. (2006). Value-Based Metrics for Improving Results – An Enterprise Project Management Toolkit. Fort Lauderdale, FL: J. Ross Publishing, Inc.

The Boston Consulting Group (BCG®). (2013). Strategic Initiative Management – The PMO Imperative; Report November 2013. Boston, MA: Author.

The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited (EIU). (2013). Why Good Strategies Fail – Lessons for the C-suite; Report July 2013. New York, NY: Author.

Thomas, J. & Mullaly, M. (2008). Researching The Value of Project Management. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute.

Wideman, R.M. (2004). A Management Framework for Project, Program, and Portfolio Integration. Vancouver, BC, Canada: Trafford Publishing.

 

To repeat: Dennis Bolles will be presenting a free webinar with ITMPI on March 22! Sign up here: Organizational Project Business Management and PMOs: Executive View

About Dennis Bolles

Dennis Bolles, PMP, President – DLB Associates, LLC, has over forty-five years of experience in multiple industries providing business and project management professional services. He assists organizations, as a Project Business Management Organization (PBMO) Subject Matter Expert (SME) consultant, to achieve their business strategic objectives with the analysis of their business process improvement needs and development of business and project management capabilities.
He has been a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI) since 1985, received his PMP® certification in 1986 (#81), and is a founding member of the PMI Western Michigan Chapter, serving on its Board of Directors and in several positions since its 1993 inception.
Mr. Bolles performs speaking engagements, assists Project/Program/Portfolio Organizations (PMOs) start-up teams begin the planning and implementation processes; and conducts on-site organizational project management capability assessments. He provides virtual and periodic on-site support for development of business and project management methodologies, policies, procedures, processes. systems, tools, and templates for organizational governance and corporate strategy. He assists in the implementation of a project business management methodology that integrates strategic planning, business objective development, portfolio management, program management, and project management processes to achieve strategic objectives and maximize operational efficiency enterprise-wide through the development and management of Project Management Organizations.
Mr. Bolles served as the PMI Standards Project Manager who led the project core team to a successful completion and on-time delivery of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide Third Edition in 2004. He has served on and has contributed to multiple PMI Standards bodies over the past 20 years.

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