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Achieving IT Nimbleness: 4 Steps to Start Your Journey

IT must not become marginalized as a result of the hot new technologies available. Rather, IT should give itself a makeover to become its own hot new thing. In an article for InformationWeek, Susan Nunziata shares four steps from the Hackett Group for creating a more agile IT:

  1. Reallocate resources from a transactional focus to a focus on adding value.
  2. Embrace digital transformation.
  3. Lead the organization’s information and analytics journey.
  4. Adopt customer-centric service design and delivery principles.

Big, Big Steps

Granted, each of the above steps is kind of a bear in itself, but nobody said becoming the hot new thing is easy. Regarding the first step, too many IT resources get tied up in essentially business-as-usual functions. Businesses need to take on more formal service delivery models that ensure strategic work receives the most resources. And they can cut down on complexity and redundancy by applying economies of scale more rigorously to shared services.

Meanwhile, embracing digital transformation is, well, yeah, a bear. It involves being mindful of where new technology can assist innovation, shortening application development cycles through agile, and then sprinkling DevOps on top of everything. The equally complicated other side to this equation is developing analytics that allow the business to make better moves. This is the harder half, because qualified people must be found to study the data before anything else can even occur.

About the final step, Nunziata share this:

The Hackett Group report advises IT to adopt practices such as Design Thinking, not only for external-facing solutions, but also for solutions created for internal customers. If you design and build systems and processes around customer experiences, you must take small, iterative steps and gain immediate end-user feedback. Those requirements can’t be met through waterfall development practices. One technique is to set up councils and focus groups early in the process to provide voice-of-the-customer recommendations throughout the project.

You can view the original article here: http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/enterprise-agility/achieving-it-agility-4-steps-to-start-your-journey/a/d-id/1327310

About John Friscia

John Friscia is the Editor of Computer Aid's Accelerating IT Success. He began working for Computer Aid, Inc. in 2013 and continues to provide graphic design support for AITS. He graduated summa cum laude from Shippensburg University with a B.A. in English.

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