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Selling Your Idea

The portfolio manager’s role is to act as a courier of ideas, and the best way to transport ideas is to have dynamite presentation skills. In a post for Voices on Project Management, Jen Skrabak reveals the path to presentation SUCCES. Yes, that capitalized word is an acronym.

S – imple

Don’t let a giant cluster of ideas dominate your presentation. Pick one and stick to it. The paragraph that rambles should collapse into a sleek bullet list. The quizzical jargon should revert to plain and snappy verbiage.

U – nexpected

The project list should not come slamming down on your audience all at once like a ton of bricks. Break things apart. Ask questions that stimulate them into thinking critically. Surprise them with facts or statistics that are germane to current issues and then draw them into the specific projects where your expertise is most valuable.

C – oncrete

Always use physical objects and tangible results in place of abstract ideas and obscure visions / objectives.

C – redible

Use statistics carefully (i.e. – only use reliable sources) and humble them to conform to the everyday concerns of the audience.

E – motional

Logic is a powerful tool of persuasion but remember: you’re not presenting to a group of robots. Use emotional appeals that create empathy for your product and vision. If what you are offering has any value whatsoever, it will easily link up with real issues that people care about.

S – tories

Most importantly, tell a story with your presentation. Nothing sells an idea like a good story. Did you know that people are primed to learn just about everything though a story format? If you don’t believe me, look it up on a professional psychology blog!

Read the full post at: http://www.projectmanagement.com/blog/Voices-on-Project-Management/11133/

About Eric Anderson

Eric Anderson is a staff writer for CAI's Accelerating IT Success. He is an intern at Computer Aid Inc., pursuing his master's degree in communications at Penn State University.

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