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4 Things That New Managers Need (And Fail) To Grasp

You're The New Manager…What Now?

You now find yourself as a new manager—so what happens next? Unsurprisingly, one of the hardest parts of becoming a new manager from inside the ranks of your own team is determining just how that should change your mindset or relationships with everyone else. This post by Alan Matthews is aimed at those who have just become new managers (or, if that doesn’t sound like you, people who make new managers happen). As Matthews explains, it comes down to a mental shift by the new manager. The first important mental shift is to understand you’re not just “one of the team” anymore:

Yes, you would like to be, and you want to be liked and accepted just as you used to be before you were promoted – but it doesn’t work like that. You cross a line when you become a manager and you’d better get used to that fact. People look at you, and treat you, differently, even people you’ve known for years. And, in a way, they should. Your role has changed now and you have some power and responsibility that you didn’t have before. The rest of the team know that, even if you don’t. Pretending nothing has changed only makes you seem weak as a manager.

The Buck Stops With You

Another helpful thing to remember: you’re responsible—in one way or another—for your team’s performance. When you become a manager, you become responsible for helping people do as well as they can at the job. It’s not just because you want them to do their best, but also because you yourself will be judged based on how well your team performs. You’ve become the representative of your team, and you must now act like it!

Read the full post here: http://www.pmhut.com/4-things-that-new-managers-need-and-fail-to-grasp

About Matthew Kabik

Matthew Kabik is the former Editor of Computer Aid's Accelerating IT Success. He worked at Computer Aid, Inc. from 2008 to 2014 in the Harrisburg offices, where he was a copywriter, swordsman, social media consultant, and trainer before moving into editorial.

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