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Why Is it Always My Fault? Take Accountability with Project Management

But I Didn’t Do It!

Yeah, we’ve all been there. Catching the blame for a miscommunication that wasn’t strictly your fault. Listening to others whine and point fingers when it clearly was theirs. Or maybe, you’ve even caught yourself making excuses when someone called you out on a mistake. Nothing makes you look worse than refusing to take the blame for a problem that was really your fault. That’s why accountability is so important. John McDonald explains how to keep others accountable with project management.

Prevent the Blame Game

Try these six steps for success in holding other’s accountable.

  1. Clear and Concise Communication: Ensure individuals on all levels and project teams understand what’s expected of them.
  2. Define the Deliverables: Also, define the milestones and responsibilities of the project, the team as a whole, and the individuals.
  3. Assign Ownership: Each task should have an owner with a deadline for their project deliverable.
  4. Hold Regular Meetings: Make sure all stakeholders are discussing the status of the project and highlighting any potential problems.
  5. Immediately Escalate Any Problems: Emphasis on immediately 
  6. Carry out Regular Audits: You need to measure the progress of the team against the project deliverables and milestones.

 

Part of the project manager’s job is making sure individuals stay accountable and don’t play the blame game. It may not be completely preventable, but with these tips you can encourage open communication and self-discipline in the project as a whole. Read the full blog post here: http://www.pmhut.com/accountability-in-projects

About Rachel Ginder

Rachel Ginder was a staff writer for CAI's Accelerating IT Success and joined the team in 2013. She also helped with social media and research.

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