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Team Communication is Key in Project Resource Management

Most kids are talking up a storm by age 2 or 3. Maybe not every word out of their mouths offers the greatest philosophical insight into the world around us, but they express what it is on their minds. As adults in business, it is up to us to keep the conversation going and communicate our wants and needs in a clear and efficient way for the benefit of the whole team. Sheryl R. writes in an article why team communication is so vital in project resource management. She begins by spelling out in very specific terms the function of teamwork: Communication is at the core of project success, which is why the project manager spends an inordinate amount of time communicating with the various project constituents. Think of it like this: Communication represents the links that bind all the project pieces together. Together, everyone involved with the project enjoys its success, or together everyone fails. It’s a win-win or lose-lose. There is no in-between. The root word team connotes togetherness, which when combined with communication results in success. That is how “teamwork” works. The author believes strongly in the ability of communication to produce team synergy, a state in which working together produces an outcome greater than the sum of its parts. Synergy also allows team members to more freely express their ideas, which stimulates more creativity and innovation. When communication is effective, messages require less effort to convey and more focus can be devoted to the project at hand. Reaching to such lofty and efficient levels of communication in a team can be done in several ways. Employing agreed-upon methods of communicating and regular team meetings are a good first step. Using status reports, being willing to hold impromptu meetings, allowing for flexibility, and encouraging each other to communicate are all handy further methods. Adults do not need to be motor mouths the way little kids are in order to get the point across, but they do need a way to get the point across. Make the most of team communication to keep the synergy running high.

About John Friscia

John Friscia is the Editor of Computer Aid's Accelerating IT Success. He began working for Computer Aid, Inc. in 2013 and continues to provide graphic design support for AITS. He graduated summa cum laude from Shippensburg University with a B.A. in English.

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