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Keeping visibility within an organization is becoming increasingly important and increasingly difficult. The answer to making sure executives and managers alike know who does what may be as simple as referencing the humble org chart--but most compan

Improving Organizational Planning and Communication

Keeping visibility within an organization is becoming increasingly important and increasingly difficult. The answer to making sure executives and managers alike know who does what may be as simple as referencing the humble org chart–but most companies don't keep this chart as up to date as possible, nor do they utilize it to its full potential. This article by Martin Sacks explains why and how org charts facilitate success both in visibility, project success, and company health. One point brought up is how organizational charts can be linked to other elements, promoting a quick and instant way of planning and understanding what work is being done:

Organizational charts provide management with a planning and feedback system. It's easy to collaborate on important structural and personnel decisions when viewing both the individual pieces together with the big picture. Providing managers with specific departmental information can then be used as a baseline for planning, budgeting and workforce modeling.

Organizational charts can be linked directly to spreadsheets or budgeting tools for interactive what-if analysis – facilitating planning and decision making. Those charts can then be used to provide scenarios back to executives, finance and HR for evaluation and approval. Managers can also use them to communicate and solicit feedback from their employees to build future plans.

On a strictly physical level, org charts provide a visible means of understanding enormous amounts of data. Employees are more able to absorb information if presented with a visual representation of teams, as well as how they fit in the organization as a whole. This helps share the strategic vision of the company, even if at such a basic, technical level.

About Matthew Kabik

Matthew Kabik is the former Editor of Computer Aid's Accelerating IT Success. He worked at Computer Aid, Inc. from 2008 to 2014 in the Harrisburg offices, where he was a copywriter, swordsman, social media consultant, and trainer before moving into editorial.

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