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A dysfunctional project team will make any project cost more money and result in a worse overall final product. Regardless of the intelligence of the team, if dysfunction spreads throughout the team, you can expect the project to struggle, falter, a

Working with Dysfunctional Project Teams: Advice and Solutions

A dysfunctional project team will make any project cost more money and result in a worse overall final product. Regardless of the intelligence of the team, if dysfunction spreads throughout the team, you can expect the project to struggle, falter, and potentially fail. This post from Bright Hub provides a few characteristics of a dysfunctional team (to help you identify if you are dealing with one) and solutions to help get your team back on track:

Project teams are a growing segment of high matrix organizations. Working together for a designated period of time, they utilize diverse skills and experiences while working towards achieving departmental or organizational goals. As team characteristics, such as size and roles can vary, members are required to participate one hundred percent in group projects throughout the project lifecycle. By employing the right combination of skills, abilities, personalities and commitment, the team has a solid chance of gaining success on both individual and group levels. But what about when the team doesn't work so seamlessly together?

The dysfunctions included are a lack of commitment, trust, unproven strategies for success, micromanagement, lack of interest, a lack of accountability, and avoiding conflict. These are, in the most part, person to person issues and problems. Because of this, it may seem harder to fix these problems (it’s always harder to change people than it is to change processes). However, the truth is there are set ways, as provided in this post, to help even the most wayward of project teams to find their footing again. For instance, leaders can provide a more clear leadership with expressed goals and expectations. Furthermore, leaders can help build teams through ice-breakers and warm-ups. On the analytics side, leaders should identify non-performers, conduct performance reviews and measure team progress. These are just as important as understanding and helping the team itself – knowing who is succeeding and who is failing within a team might give a better impression what areas of the group need to be focused on and which are, in fact, doing the work successfully.

About Matthew Kabik

Matthew Kabik is the former Editor of Computer Aid's Accelerating IT Success. He worked at Computer Aid, Inc. from 2008 to 2014 in the Harrisburg offices, where he was a copywriter, swordsman, social media consultant, and trainer before moving into editorial.

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