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Bigger isn't always better, and that applies perfectly to large IT teams doing projects. Pablo Valerio understands that the processes inherent with large project teams can crush the success of a project, and instead offers a few small-team proje

IT Project Management: Think Small

Bigger isn't always better, and that applies perfectly to large IT teams doing projects. Pablo Valerio understands that the processes inherent with large project teams can crush the success of a project, and instead offers a few small-team project management techniques that can help facilitate a much better outcome for any sized team and project. First, Valerio stresses the values of small project thinking: smaller project teams can form stronger relationships with the outcome of the project as well as the others working on the project itself, leading to a more positive outcome. Small teams develop ownership over a project more than larger teams, they also are easier to control and more flexible. The last point is accountability: smaller teams have fewer people to “blame” for errors, so people are more likely to recognize their responsibilities and accountabilities within the project. But it isn't a complete fix: Valerio points out some of the dangers as well: That said, there are pitfalls to avoid when you're managing a small team or a small project. A large team or large-scale project forces a certain level of discipline upon the process, and upon the stakeholders. It's too easy, though, to forgo some of the principles of good project management when working in small teams or pursuing small projects. These, by their nature, tend to invite a casual, collegial exchange. There's certainly nothing wrong with a collegial exchange when working on a project, but becoming casual can also have the effect of becoming careless, allowing for projects to fail simply because people didn't utilize the processes put in place to assure project success. While there isn't a right answer to the question between managing a small project group or a large project group: there are benefits and drawbacks of both. However, Valerio suggests taking a good look at both options and determining what works best for the work being performed and the team doing that work.

About Anne Grybowski

Anne is a former staff writer for CAI's Accelerating IT Success, with a degree in Media Studies from Penn State University.

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