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2013 Trends in Business Analysis and Project Management

One year’s trends are another year’s history lessons. An article on Business Analyst Times says that after looking at 2012, the trends for 2013 will lean toward competencies. In other words, companies will see a greater rate of success amongst employees who have the most training. As the article notes, the more training you have, the more valuable you will be in 2013:

This year we want to concentrate on trends for 2013 relating to an emphasis on competencies. As people become skilled and certified, their base knowledge and abilities are in place. PM, BA, CSM, and BPM practitioners also need to apply their tangible skills to solving problems and helping our organizations achieve their objectives. For example, let’s say Jane knows how to model business processes and how to improve them. But, she may not always get time from stakeholders to understand their process, or establish trust with them to learn the root causes of process problems. She may also run into sharp disagreements about how a new process should be designed or conflicting priorities for what to improve first.

As we can see, being competent leads to avoiding issues. The article lists some specific competency trends we should expect to see in 2013:

  • Project professionals need to provide advice, not push back
  • Organizations want scribes, not note-takers
  • Organizations are beginning to recognize that agile projects require the ability to influence stakeholders
  • Organizations are recognizing the cost of virtual teams
  • Productivity and speed require the use of disparate and uncoordinated social media and collaboration tools
  • Consensus is giving way to “productive conflict”

The overall theme of these new trends seems to be increased involvement: if you are going to be doing anything within an organization, you need to give 100% of your effort. If you do not give everything you have, your organization knows that there are people out there with more competency training who will.
Also, it is important to take all training opportunities that come your way. You may not think you need to know everything about one specific area of IT or project management, but your organization might. There is nothing wrong with being over prepared for your job, because you may be the first to benefits from the new trends of 2013.

About Anne Grybowski

Anne is a former staff writer for CAI's Accelerating IT Success, with a degree in Media Studies from Penn State University.

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